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What is the most consistent movement or strength dysfunction that limits performance?

Hamstring injuries are common in sports, and from a coaching perspective we need to look at them from three angles: mobility, strength, and power.
 
Transcript: "One of the most common movement and strength dysfunctions across all sports is hamstring injuries. From a coaching perspective, we want to look at this from three ways-- mobility, strength, and power. First, does the athlete have the requisite range of motion at their joints and extensibility in their tissues? Second, can they produce force through that range of motion? And then third, can they demonstrate that athletically with explosive power and speed?"
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Dan Daly

Swimming Strength & Conditioning Coach
One of the most common movement and strength dysfunctions across all sports is hamstring injuries. From a coaching perspective, we want to look at this from three ways-- mobility, strength, and power. First, does the athlete have the requisite range of motion at their joints and extensibility in their tissues? Second, can they produce force through that range of motion? And then third, can they demonstrate that athletically with explosive power and speed?
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John Sinclair

Health and Human Performance Engineer
Hi, Jim, that's a great question. What is the most consistent movement or strength? Dysfunction that limits performance? I'm going to look at this and term and answer this in terms of what I see all the time that can eventually lead to an injury and or / / poor performance in their movement, abilities, as well as their strength and that is when the pelvis is out of its optimal position. So we sometimes say out of its neutral alignment and or we have a Function. So you realize this that when the pelvis, it has an up slip and or rotation, then the tensional balance throughout the entire system becomes off. So how we strike the ground when we run is off how I, how my body shifts. Its weight is off. So I'm not going to be as strong because as soon as I try to do something like a squatter, a lunge in my pelvis is is up slipped and rotated on one side and or just rotated opposite of one another. Then the way we receive forces is not very efficient. The hip joint itself is probably not in its instantaneous axis of rotation, the foot and ankle is probably not rotating pronating supinating all at the right times. And of course, that's going to affect all of our motor programs. So one of the things I always do with all the athletes. The first thing they do when they come in, as they do a general warm up just to get some sir. Elation going as I call Global circulation, then we do some local circulation in the form of rub and scrub around the pelvis. We take a foam roller and we wiggle against that and make sure that we line up our pelvis. So we go to Six really important points on the, on the pelvis. We go to the lumbosacral Joint, we go to the sacroiliac joint, we go to the iliofemoral Joint, we go to the pubic symphysis, we go to the greater trochanter, and of course we go to the missing one. on the they say iliofemoral joint. Anyways, those are the places that we go to and make sure we get a good rub and scrub in there and then we do a variety of different squats, body weight, and lunges to make sure that we balance the pelvis out before we ask them to load or to do any of their Dynamic warm-ups.
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Paul Edmondson

Health and Human Performance Educator
Hey Jim. This is a really awesome question. One, that's very pertinent to our movement industry and one that I hope will engage the group with many questions and much dialogue. And there's already been to Great answers prior to this one, am I won. So, the most consistent movement or strength dysfunction that I see that limits performance, whether it's general population, or athletic population, the No, I see. Most is confined spaces and not enough room in which to maneuver their body determinants. So what I mean by determinants, I mean, the joint spaces that executes motion. So if you've been sat down for years and years at your desk and haven't moved your joints in all three planes of motion, then you have confined spaces, you have not much afferent feedback. Back there for you. Don't have very good efferent feed-forward mechanisms and your ability to access muscle. Tissue is inhibited because you don't have ownership over your joints, therefore you can't access as much muscle tissue, as you would like to desire and therefore you accommodate in your exercise soon and your strength performance, hits a plateau, very soon. And worse case because you hit plateaus and your train the same tissue. Chances are that tissue yields breaks and injury, and shoes, athletic population. Same, although their athletic, they move generally with constraints, they move in similar ways, take it in the gym, the power athlete's body, builders that train bench, squat, deadlift, Etc, their training One Direction. So they're strong on one line and they're weak on every other line. And again because they can only access A certain muscle tissue plateaus a hick too soon. Whereas if they opened up and cultivated space and accessed more muscle, fiber to contribute to their exercise, their performance would be enhanced. So for me, expand joint ranges control, those joint ranges and will see strength and performance go up.
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Gina Grain

🇨🇦 '08 Olympian, S&C Coach
What is the most consistent movement or strength? Is function, that limits performance? So I am going to say, definitely the hip hinge, okay? You need that hip hinge to get hip flexion, which is very important for glute. Activation glute activation, the most powerful muscle, one of the most powerful muscles in the body. Your glutes, really important for forward drive in the sagittal plane. Really important for frontal Drive change of Direction. Reaction, speed power, everything is driven by the glutes. And as we sit a lot as our hip flexors get tights and quads get tight, we tend to get glue to you. I'm nisha's. So, I see that people who do not have or lose the ability to hit Flex or hinge are losing out on the for the major Force generator of the glutes.
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Tim Crowley

🇺🇸 Olympic Triathlon Strength Coach
Here, what is the most consistent movement that limits performance? Obviously, if we're an exercise standpoint, what I see, especially working with young developing athletes, is the inability to hinge at the hip properly. It's something we work on from day one and we need to do this in order for us to actually like, do Olympic lifts or proper squatting deadlifting, as well, as trap bar work, etc. So this is often a hard thing to do. Ichiro is working on ways and queuing to do that, whether it's, you know, bilateral unilateral stuff using bands at the hip, or try to get an athlete to kind of move from the hip and not move at the Loeb, at the low back into spending its bending at the lumbar spine. So it's probably the single biggest thing that will be a limiter because it's going to limit our ceiling of all the things that we can do building upon that.