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How do you manage multiple patient cases at once without compromising quality of care or patient satisfaction?

I have my own practice where I see people one-on-one typically for an hour. It can be challenging to handle multiple cases at the same time, particularly when it comes to chronic pain. In these cases, it takes a slower, one-on-one approach in order to get to the root of the problem and build up their confidence in movement.
 
Transcript: "So now I have my own practice where I see people one-on-one typically for an hour. So I really don't have to manage multiple cases at the same time but I will say that it's very challenging when you're handling three or four people and you know it gets easier if they're just having more sort of your biomechanical issues, ankle like recent ankle sprain, or if you're doing something post surgically, but when you deal with chronic pain, type of case, you really need to see that person one-on-one for some chunk of time. Time to get down to the root of the problem. So what has what's created the chronicity of their pain, you have to slowly build them back up. And that takes, you have to teach them how to be confident in their movement. Again, you have to teach them how not to have fear around movement and things like that, and that really does take a lot slower, one-on-one approach. So, fortunately, I don't have to deal with it a ton at the moment and but I cuz I think it's harder to really truly manage, those people. Well, while you're doing multiple things at the same time,"
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Jim Heafner

Physical Therapist, Author
So now I have my own practice where I see people one-on-one typically for an hour. So I really don't have to manage multiple cases at the same time but I will say that it's very challenging when you're handling three or four people and you know it gets easier if they're just having more sort of your biomechanical issues, ankle like recent ankle sprain, or if you're doing something post surgically, but when you deal with chronic pain, type of case, you really need to see that person one-on-one for some chunk of time. Time to get down to the root of the problem. So what has what's created the chronicity of their pain, you have to slowly build them back up. And that takes, you have to teach them how to be confident in their movement. Again, you have to teach them how not to have fear around movement and things like that, and that really does take a lot slower, one-on-one approach. So, fortunately, I don't have to deal with it a ton at the moment and but I cuz I think it's harder to really truly manage, those people. Well, while you're doing multiple things at the same time,
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Dr. Brian Cunningham

🇺🇸 Olympic Swim Team Physiotherapist
How do you manage multiple patient cases at once, without compromising quality of care or patient satisfaction? Well, I got out of the medical model and that's exactly what happens in a hospital base system and working Private Practice. I see patients and clients one-on-one for an hour and I work for my clients, not for insurance companies. And what I mean by that is I am not dictated by insurance but I'm dictated by the goals and needs of my clients. That's what I look at patient or client satisfaction.
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Nick Hadinger

Physical Therapist, US National Team
How do you manage multiple patient cases at once, without compromising quality of care? Patient satisfaction. So in our practice, we actually don't see multiple people at a time. And that's because I don't think that you can really give Optimal Care to someone. If you're managing, you two or three or four, or even five people at a time at some of these other clinics. So, we're just one-on-one the entire time. And that's nice from a patient perspective, there's a lot more buy-in but from a provider perspective obviously the paperwork is a little bit less but it really gives you ample time to prepare for everyone that you're seeing that day. And so, I think that the quality of care is not compromised at all. When you see people wanting a Time
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Jen Dieter

PT - 8x Crossfit Games Athlete
This question is, how do you manage multiple patient cases at once, without compromising quality of care or patient satisfaction? I've been a PT for 24 years and I have definitely worked in places where I have had several patients at once, going all day long, and my thing is, I want to always make that patient feel like during their session, they were the most important thing that was going on during the session. So I might be Hands-On with one person. While one person is doing some exercises. Or stretches one person may or may not be on a modality or something like that, if they really need it, or somebody might be doing, you know, something where I can be queuing them on their exercise while I'm Hands-On with another patient. So, basically, you want to make sure that you are giving them attention at All Phases of their PT session. You don't ever want to just have someone like go off and do their exercises, where you can't see them, or they can't hear you. And that you should always be able able to give them verbal cues while they're doing the exercises. Even if you're doing something that is requiring, your immediate attention with a patient right in front of you.
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Lisa Pataky, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS

Head Physical Therapist, Overtime Elite
How do you manage multiple patient cases at once without compromising quality of care or patient satisfaction? I'm a really big planner. So if I know that I have a lot of athletes coming in, or if I have athletes coming in at the same time, regardless of how many people I'm seeing in a day or at a time I always try and plan out what I want them to do that day. So even if it's not the specific exercises which I do try to get down to that granularity, I always have a theme for the day. So if I want my athlete to focus, on deceleration for that session and might have picked out five or six things for them to focus on, obviously subject, to change based on how they're feeling or how they do with a workout, but always still with the same goal of that exercise in mind of that day session in mind. And so, that way, I don't get too overwhelmed with having to manage multiple things at once, because I at least have something in writing that I can look at for what I want everybody to be. Cursing on. And then I have overall rehab plans for all of my athletes that I'm working with, so I can make sure that I'm staying on track of everything and not getting too overwhelmed with having a lot of cases at the same time.