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How much sleep do you get each night? Any pointers for getting a better night of sleep?

I average 8 hours of sleep a night and recently started using the whoop 4.0 wristband to help improve my sleep and recovery. My tips for getting a better night's sleep include going to bed at the same time each night, not letting the dog in the bed, turning off work related things an hour before bed, and sleeping in a cooler room.
 
Transcript: "Hey, Ed. Thanks for the question. So I average about 8 hours, sleep a night. But I've actually just recently started using the whoop 4.0 wristband. And this has been massive for helping me improve my sleep and my recovery, so I am average in about eight hours, sleep a night, but my kind of training load is much lower at the moment, because I'm in a bit of an offseason period. So I imagine that I'm going to need more sleep than that. With my training load goes up and I do know myself that sometimes I will get 10. Twelve hours sleep when I've done a massive training day just to maximize the recovery. So I'm looking forward to kind of using the whoop just to maximize that and just see kind of if I get more sleep, if I can train harder and look at the more metrics that are involved in that. So that's pretty exciting. But generally my kind of top tips for getting a better night's sleep, are aiming to go to bed at the same time, each night and aiming to get up at the same time each day. I think that just really helps the body, get into a better routine. Definitely not letting the dog in the bed because that just interrupt your sleep. So sorry, Lola. She is now sleeping downstairs. Kind of trying to come off of any work-related things turning your phone off like an hour before. You're going to go to bed, just to let the Mind unwind and switch off. And I actually find going to bed like in a cooler room. Helps me get to sleep a lot quicker. So hopefully some of those tips help you guys out."
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Lucy Charles-Barclay

🇬🇧 Long - World 70.3 🥇, IM World 🥈
Hey, Ed. Thanks for the question. So I average about 8 hours, sleep a night. But I've actually just recently started using the whoop 4.0 wristband. And this has been massive for helping me improve my sleep and my recovery, so I am average in about eight hours, sleep a night, but my kind of training load is much lower at the moment, because I'm in a bit of an offseason period. So I imagine that I'm going to need more sleep than that. With my training load goes up and I do know myself that sometimes I will get 10. Twelve hours sleep when I've done a massive training day just to maximize the recovery. So I'm looking forward to kind of using the whoop just to maximize that and just see kind of if I get more sleep, if I can train harder and look at the more metrics that are involved in that. So that's pretty exciting. But generally my kind of top tips for getting a better night's sleep, are aiming to go to bed at the same time, each night and aiming to get up at the same time each day. I think that just really helps the body, get into a better routine. Definitely not letting the dog in the bed because that just interrupt your sleep. So sorry, Lola. She is now sleeping downstairs. Kind of trying to come off of any work-related things turning your phone off like an hour before. You're going to go to bed, just to let the Mind unwind and switch off. And I actually find going to bed like in a cooler room. Helps me get to sleep a lot quicker. So hopefully some of those tips help you guys out.
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Bruno Fratus

Olympic & World Medalist Swimmer
Hi, Ed. Excellent question. That's great because a lot of my performance, and I believe that a lot of every athlete's performance comes from recovery, comes from sleep. Sleep plays a vital role in our everyday lives. So I do like to take a minimum of eight hours of sleep every night. I do love an hour, two hours nap after lunch. And what I recommend people doing is stay off screens, at least, an hour before you go to bed, even though it's hard. And I struggle to do it myself. But it's a nice thing. Someone once told me that works really well.
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Jolanda Neff

Olympic 🥇 MTB World Champion
I'm a really good sleeper, and I have always been all my life. We grew up next to a road that was very busy and so that made me learn to sleep basically anywhere. I can fall asleep in the plane, I can fall asleep in the busiest room. I can basically sleep anywhere any time. And so I sleep really good at night, and I don't really know how many hours I get each night. It's always a bit different, but yeah, just as much as that I feel good the next day. And tips for getting a better night of sleep, ride your bike until you're very tired, and I promise you will sleep very good.
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Matt Hanson

🇺🇸 Long - 4x North American Champ, Coach
Personally, I try to be lights out by 10:00 PM every night, and I'm typically up between 5:30 and 6:30, depending on the day, and what I have going on that day. But it's not just the amount of sleep that you're getting or the amount of time that you're in bed, it's the quality of sleep. How quickly you're able to fall asleep? Are you getting up frequently throughout the night, and things like that? And so a few things that I've learned to try to make this better for me, personally, I never have caffeine after 2:00. I try to take any multivitamin that might have a B-complex in it, for example, earlier in the morning. B-complex is a stimulant, so that might keep you up later at night. I try to keep the same routine, bedtime routine, where I'm starting to wind down around the same time every night, try to be in bed and around the same time every night. And, yeah, those are a couple of the things that I've found that have helped me out a little bit to improve not just the total number of hours that I sleep but also the quality of sleep that I'm getting.
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Kate Courtney

🇺🇸 Olympian, World Champ, World Cup overall
Hi, Ed. Great question. I personally believe sleep is the key to recovery and spend a lot of time making sure that I get the best sleep possible to recover between workouts. One of the best ways I think to start doing that is to track your sleep. So I use Whoop, but there's a lot of different ways to keep track of the sleep you're getting and understand whether you're sleeping patterns are working for you. And then, beyond that, I think there's a few things that are kind of simple tricks. Number one sleep consistency. So going to bed and waking up at the same time is shown to be one of the most effective things you can do to get a good night's sleep. Second, light. So making sure that your room is dark or you sleep with an eye shade can be really helpful. Three is having like a cool room to sleep in. So all these kind of like small things can really impact it. And then number four, I would say the last kind of tip that I would have is limiting looking at screens before bed or getting blue light-blocking glasses. So, for me, I sleep with my phone out of the room entirely. And made a huge difference for me because when I'm really tired, I tend to just kind of like look at my phone. And that can not only keep you up from being distracted, but also the blue light does kind of prevent your body from releasing melatonin and getting into that sleepy state. So, hopefully, some of those tips are helpful. But I think really it's just optimizing your routine around what's going to work best for you and what's going to get you that time in bed and time of sleep that you need to recover every day.
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Jonny Brownlee

🇬🇧 Short - Olympic 🥇🥈🥉 7x World Champ
Thanks for the question and every night. I get about 8 hours sleep, or try and get at least eight hours sleep. It's the best form of recovery. I tried me bed by 10:00, and now I don't wake up till about 7:15. So hopefully eight hours. Hopefully a little bit more, and my main point is for good, sleep routine, firstly to have a routine try. And if that is a cup of chamomile tea, a bit of chill time, and then go to bed. Keep your room nice and cold. So it's not too warm. Make sure a nice and comfy. And my biggest tip is put your phone either outside the room, or as far away from you as possible. So you can spend all nights going through your phone. Unless you are good questions like this, of course, but no routines important. A cold bedroom and keep your phone away. Hope that helps.