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Do you use data for your training? What specifically?

I use data for training, but not for racing because it can lead to a negative mindset. I may use data when racing if my coach wants to review the data afterwards.
 
Transcript: "So I am big into data for training. I use different platforms just to look at the power that I put out on the bike. I like to track my recovery after training. I'm always looking at my heart rate to get an idea of how fatigued I am. But actually, recently, in racing, I've decided to race with no data. So I will use it in training. I will judge my effort on, OK, this is how many works I'm pushing. And this is how I feel. And actually-- so when I went and won the World title in St. George, I didn't use any data apart from just my feedback of how I was feeling. And obviously, I had the average speed and the speed that I was moving at. But that just kept me in a far more positive mindset because I was like, I feel good. So we're just going to go with I feel good. That's good. That's positive rather than sometimes when you have the data on your bike computer in front of you, and you're thinking that's not the amount of works I want to push. My heart rate's too high. What's happening. You can spiral into a negative mindset. So I definitely will stand by using data in training. I think it's really good to track your progress to see if you're going in the right direction, or are you too fatigued. But in racing. I don't know if I would use it again, unless, for example, my coach wants to review the data afterwards. Because it's probably quite frustrating for them to not have the data afterwards to actually know what I did do. So maybe I would have the data being recorded, but not necessarily look at it."
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Lucy Charles-Barclay

🇬🇧 Long - World 70.3 🥇, IM World 🥈
So I am big into data for training. I use different platforms just to look at the power that I put out on the bike. I like to track my recovery after training. I'm always looking at my heart rate to get an idea of how fatigued I am. But actually, recently, in racing, I've decided to race with no data. So I will use it in training. I will judge my effort on, OK, this is how many works I'm pushing. And this is how I feel. And actually-- so when I went and won the World title in St. George, I didn't use any data apart from just my feedback of how I was feeling. And obviously, I had the average speed and the speed that I was moving at. But that just kept me in a far more positive mindset because I was like, I feel good. So we're just going to go with I feel good. That's good. That's positive rather than sometimes when you have the data on your bike computer in front of you, and you're thinking that's not the amount of works I want to push. My heart rate's too high. What's happening. You can spiral into a negative mindset. So I definitely will stand by using data in training. I think it's really good to track your progress to see if you're going in the right direction, or are you too fatigued. But in racing. I don't know if I would use it again, unless, for example, my coach wants to review the data afterwards. Because it's probably quite frustrating for them to not have the data afterwards to actually know what I did do. So maybe I would have the data being recorded, but not necessarily look at it.
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Sam Long

🇺🇸 Long - IM World Champion 🥈
Yes. I'm not obsessed-- well, let me not start with yes because that won't be good. I'm not obsessed with data in training. I mostly leave that to the coach. But I definitely like the watts, especially on the bike. I view it as a video game. And I just, you know. It's like pushing the buttons on the controller, only you're pushing your legs into the pedals to get the watts to read higher. And I just find the data always so fun. And I love analyzing it after. But I try not to let it completely control my sessions as well and have some sense of feeling.
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Kate Courtney

🇺🇸 Olympian, World Champ, World Cup overall
As a self-proclaimed data nerd I had to answer this one. I love numbers. I think they're super motivating. They're really helpful in terms of tracking and planning your training and also when things don't go well being able to isolate what needs to change, when things go well isolating what you did that worked and being able to replicate it. So big data fan. That being said, I think no one piece of data is that valuable. So on the bike I use a power meter, I use a heart rate monitor. We put all of that data into training peaks. It tracks fitness and recovery and form and load. So a lot of different sources of information. And I think what's useful is to be able to track trends in that information. So if you collect data in the same way week over week, month over month, year over year, then you can compare and start to build the bigger picture around that data. I also use data in the gym. We use force plates and measures of velocity especially in the off season to kind of track how I'm doing in my strength training. Simpler ways to do that are just do something like a five squat max test or we use a pull up test. So there's a lot of different ways to measure progress and a lot of different types of data. The final one I would add to that is recovery scores. I use WHOOP. I know there's a lot of other options in terms of tracking recovery. But I think having a baseline for heart rate, heart rate variability, how you sleep that's another source of data that can be useful. But again, is only useful when it's part of the story and when you know OK, when I'm in shape, this is what my data should look like. When I'm in the off season, this is what to expect. When am I just tired? When am I getting sick? So again, love data but I think it's super important to have a structure around it and integrate it all so that you get a complete picture of what your training is actually doing.
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Jan Frodeno

🇩🇪 All - Olympic 🥇 & 5x IM World Champ
So wearables and trackables and data have become so inherent in the sport that they've changed and they approach altogether. I think I remember the times when I used to fill out a sheet with pen and paper at the end of the week and handed in terms of getting a girl rough idea of what I thought I had trained. Whereas these days, you know, you have all kinds of parameters being measured at any time and they just get uploaded automatically into a cloud. And luckily. I have a very Smart coach who analyzes them. What it does help me do is compare myself over the season and to various years. And so I would go with heart rate Pace as in GPS, running pace power and glucose, being my most important data metrics that I use,
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Joe Skipper

🇬🇧 Long - Multiple Ironman/70.3 Champion
Yeah, I always use that date of my training. So power on the bike, use that to guide some of the workouts. Although, I would say that I'm not a slave to the numbers. Like I don't Nest like rely solely on it and have to stick to certain numbers, but love looking at it afterwards, pace for me, on the run. So not so much. Heart rate. Although I will record it, my harder sessions, but I use pays more for run sessions and swimming just used like time, just speed per 100 meters. So we have everything. Thing record all the data don't necessarily spend ages looking at it, but it's nice to have to reflect back on.
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Nino Schurter

Olympic 🥇🥈🥉 10x MTB World Champion
Yeah, I use a lot of data for my training. I record actually every training. If it's running cycling gym in Winter. Naughty seen, I recorded all with my Garmin devices. When I do Runnings have a Garmin watch. I, when I go riding, I have a Garmin computer where I record the hard way to the power. I've always a power meter on my bike and I record all of Other data like how many kilometers? I do how much climbing and also the racing I record and they use this data to analyze the racing. How it went, how Compares? Well, how was the feeling from the race compared to the data afterwards? And it's something that gives you a lot of value to see when things go, right? Or since not going, right to make the right decisions or the right? Meaning of the words.