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Do you track your training and recovery with data? If so, what do you do with it?

Yes we track our training and Recovery with data. We use it to calibrate how the athletes feel they implemented training with what the data tells us, to monitor current training loads, and to more accurately plan future training loads. We also look at recovery parameters like MSSD data and a standard deviation of the seven-day moving average to assess the athlete's readiness.
 
Transcript: "Brett asks, do you track your training and Recovery with data and if so what do you do with it? Good morning, Brett. Yes we've used first be to collect our training and Recovery data for the past 15 years and in particular, in the last five years or so. The science has been very clear in those athletes, who tracked, the training, loads and Recovery with HRV data tend to perform better than those who have just used a plan program. We use the data to calibrate how the athletes feel they implemented training with what the training data tells us particularly for Less experienced athletes. This helps them to learn and dial in the proper training. Intensity to achieve the desired training effect, we use the data to monitor the current training loads and to more accurately plan the future training, loads, Many coaches, use H, km or mileage, to measure the training. None of those metrics. Can accurately describe the total load of training. There are many methods to measure training loads that are used by different software platforms, but they all use some measure of intensity and duration. Then we also look at the recovery parameters. We typically do a three-minute test in the morning and then in assessing the athletes Readiness. We look at the Baseline, are mssd data and a standard deviation of the seven day. Moving average to determine the athletes of adaptability to training and whether adjustments in the program or delay of a hard session need to be addressed"
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Jim Galanes

🇺🇸 Olympic XC Skier - '76, '80, '84
Brett asks, do you track your training and Recovery with data and if so what do you do with it? Good morning, Brett. Yes we've used first be to collect our training and Recovery data for the past 15 years and in particular, in the last five years or so. The science has been very clear in those athletes, who tracked, the training, loads and Recovery with HRV data tend to perform better than those who have just used a plan program. We use the data to calibrate how the athletes feel they implemented training with what the training data tells us particularly for Less experienced athletes. This helps them to learn and dial in the proper training. Intensity to achieve the desired training effect, we use the data to monitor the current training loads and to more accurately plan the future training, loads, Many coaches, use H, km or mileage, to measure the training. None of those metrics. Can accurately describe the total load of training. There are many methods to measure training loads that are used by different software platforms, but they all use some measure of intensity and duration. Then we also look at the recovery parameters. We typically do a three-minute test in the morning and then in assessing the athletes Readiness. We look at the Baseline, are mssd data and a standard deviation of the seven day. Moving average to determine the athletes of adaptability to training and whether adjustments in the program or delay of a hard session need to be addressed
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Jessie Diggins

US Olympic XC Skier🥇🥈🥉
I do track my training and Recovery with data, I actually have an aura ring and to switch hands. I'll show you. It's on this and and so I sleep with it and I follow my heart rate, my HRV. How much deep sleep and REM sleep in my getting and how much sleep over all? I also try to make sure that I don't rely solely on the data. So, I fill out a questionnaire in my training log, where I subjectively rate, how do I felt like I slept, what is my stress level in everyday life? Am I packing up and moving? Do I have a lot of other things going on? That is going to make it harder for my body to recover. So then I combine the data with how I feel and do my best to react accordingly in my training plan. So if I'm feeling a little off and the data is also saying yeah, you know you're a little off then maybe I push back intervals a day or two because it's important to make sure that when I'm training I'm getting the most out of it and not Not just blindly following the plan without checking in to see how my body actually feels.
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Julia Kern

🇺🇸 Olympic XC Skier
I track my training with a training log. I have been on an online version before, I've tried a few different versions and decided the good old-fashioned Excel. She weighs best way because I could formulate it how I want and track the measures that are important to me. So I track through an Excel spreadsheet that I've made myself. And for Recovery I have been using this ordering for about one or two years. And yeah, about a little bit over a year and I've found that it's really helpful for keeping me accountable to sleep enough. That's probably the biggest thing. But also just seeing how my recovery is my REM sleep, my body temperature where I am like I think hrvs been really interesting to see like am I ready for the day? What's putting stress on my body? Should I eat a little bit? Further away from Bedtime? My dinner and what how I eat and train effects, my sleep. Beep. So I found that really interesting. I think it's a useful metric to track, but it also doesn't dictate my training because in the end, how I feel on a given days, the most important thing. So I think tracking super helpful, I think it's fun to nerd out about at the end of the season and see like the trends and try to make sense of it and play around with the data. But
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Gus Schumacher

🇺🇸 Olympic XC Skier
Do I track my training and Recovery with data and what do I do? Yeah, I track my training through a training log which is just an Excel spreadsheet and it's very dependent on my comments. So that's pretty cool qualitative. And then, I also track my training recovery through my polar watch, which is very quantitative and I kind of use that in tandem with my fit like my personal feelings and how I feel waking up to decide what I want to do for the day and I'm a big person. I'm with a plan. I really like to make a plan at the beginning of the week and stick to it, but definitely sometimes if I wake up, not feeling right. I try to trust that and I think a big part of it is just feeling myself, so I'm not. So data-driven, I would say, but I do use the, my resting heart rate data, as a bit of a metric as well as, you know, tracking how I feel in training.